Languages of Truth Coasts on the Surface

I just finished reading Salman Rushdie’s book of essays, Languages of Truth, that my father had bought last year. If it appears to be a timely read, considering the attack on his life in New York recently, so it is. If one thinks about why he attracts so much hate and vitriol even today, it’s… Continue reading Languages of Truth Coasts on the Surface

Protected: Reading for VUCA

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Protected: Reading to Understand the World

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Reportage as News, History, Literature?

In the days, when there is hardly any news reported from on the ground, whether in print, or on television, and much of it not believable, one wonders whatever happened to reportage, as it used to be called. Now, I am not a journalist, though I do write – in my advertising and brand communications… Continue reading Reportage as News, History, Literature?

Protected: Summer of Discontent 2022

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Sleazy Potboiler After Potter

If anyone could go one better in fiction after the Harry Potter books, it ought to have been JK Rowling herself. Sadly, The Casual Vacancy has to go down as her worst book, and I haven’t checked if she’s written any since. My father bought The Casual Vacancy – that too, a hardback – a… Continue reading Sleazy Potboiler After Potter

Development and All That We Understand by It

When reading newspapers or books or watching the news, we often come across the word development. It is a term so often used to mean growth, loosely speaking, that when attached to any other word, it takes on new meanings. Urban development, rural development, industrial development, sustainable development, etc. Then, of course, we have the… Continue reading Development and All That We Understand by It

Protected: Keeping the Cool, While the Heat Rages

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The Nutmeg’s Curse, of Colonisation and Capitalism

While I was still contemplating buying Amitav Ghosh’s newest book, The Nutmeg’s Curse, my father had already ordered it from Amazon India. Well, I’m not complaining. I greatly admire his writing, having owned and read several of his books, before I lost almost all of my books to termites at my parents’ flat in Goa.… Continue reading The Nutmeg’s Curse, of Colonisation and Capitalism